Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Posts Tagged ‘antique

Ribbon and Reed Pattern Lion Door Knocker

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Door knockers are a piece of ancient hardware history, and were at the height of their popularity about one hundred years ago.  This was back in the days before cell phones and electric door knobs.  It was common to find a home that had a bell-pull type door knob; these were typically on the more elaborately decorated homes of the wealthy. It was more likely that you would find a door knocker on a home instead.

Antique Brass Ribbon and Reed Lion Door Knocker

Antique Brass Ribbon and Reed Lion Door Knocker

Depending on your financial status depended on how decorative of a door knocker your home would have, or if you would have one at all.  The wealthier you were, the more decorative the style.  The wealthiest people would generally have a door knocker in the shape of an animal head, with a lion’s head being the most famous and popular ones.  Door knockers like these can be found on some of the most famous buildings throughout the United States as well as the U.K.

Manufactured in Two Sizes - 8 Finishes

Manufactured in Two Sizes - 8 Finishes

The people who came up with the designs for many of the Ribbon and Reed style door knockers have a real eye for detail.  They are exceptional at getting just enough detail in the animal heads while providing just a small amount on the ring.  These items were typically cast in polished brass so they would stand out, but copper and pewter also became popular over the years.

Made from Solid Bronze and Brass

Made from Solid Bronze and Brass

We offer this piece in two sizes – and several different finishes to match the décor of your home.  Antique bronze is the most popular, with the classic polished brass in a close second, followed by the oil rubbed bronze.  As always, we include the mounting hardware for the piece with your order in the same finish you have selected to eliminate the hassle of having to match it from the hardware store, or having to guess what size screw(s) you will need.

Colonial Coat Hooks

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When you think of the colonial time period, many people will picture hand-crafted items, from tables and chairs to dressers and bed frames.  Tools were hand-forged out of cast iron, and the time and care it took to create these items can be seen in every strike of the hammer and anvil.

Cast iron is the metal of choice when it came to creating everything from door handles and furniture hardware to pots and pans and stoves and everything in between.  These were generally very simple designs, which still took hours to make despite the simplicity.  The metal would have to be constantly heated, cooled, and re-heated between strikes to ensure its strength and durability as well as to create just the right angles for everything.

Coat hooks were one thing created from cast iron that could be decorative, but nothing too elaborate.  Single hook designs were much more common than double hooks, and the backplate, or piece that attached to the wall, was often the decorative element.  Designs were usually just shapes, such as hearts, diamonds and spades, and would either be a solid piece or just an outline.

The strength of the hooks may seem to vary based on the thickness, but the fact of the matter is that these hooks were crafted so precisely that they can hold immense amounts of weight, even if it doesn’t seem that way.  There is one double hook option available, and it is very delicate in appearance but still quite strong.  If you are more interested in a hook that shows its strength while still being decorative, try one of the scroll hook designs.

The hooks vary in size, and can add the perfect touch of style and functionality to any home or business and will last for generations.  We include the necessary cast iron screws to securely attaché these to any wall.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 3, 2011 at 2:09 pm

Art Deco Push and Pull Door Plates

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     Art Deco is characterized by a linear, hard edge or angular composition, often with a vertical emphasis, and highlighted with stylized decoration (according to Blumenson). Art Deco is an eclectic artistic and design style that began in Paris in the 1920s  and flourished internationally throughout the 1930s, into the World War II era. The style influenced all areas of design, including architecture and interior design, industrial design, fashion and jewelry, as well as the visual arts such as painting, graphic arts and film.

     The Art Deco style has become quite popular in home décor due to its versatility and uniqueness.  The style typically features clean lines and geometric patterns, usually carved into the metal so as to add contrast, or embossed on the surface to help it stand out.   There are several different methods used to create such designs, though creating a mold and pouring molten metal is a popular method, and can be fairly fast to do.  It is especially popular when making pairs of door plates, ensuring that the two pieces will match exactly.

It easy to see the similarities between art deco architecture and art deco interior design. We nick named this plate "The Chrysler".

 

 

     Etching a design into the piece is generally done when a pattern is placed on the solid metal and an acid, or other chemical compound, is used to eat away at the exposed metal.  The result is a design embedded into the metal.  It is not uncommon to have color differences in the metals, allowing the pattern to stand out a little more.  This is especially the case in the push plates featured in bronze and copper.

A brilliant example of the intricate detail that goes into art deco design elements.

 

     Our pieces are available in many different finishes and metals, making it easy to find just the right one for your home or particular room you are decorating.  Art Deco is an especially nice style for decorating, since it is extremely versatile and can match any current décor.  If you prefer your décor to stand out and make a statement, consider perhaps one of the more extravagantly decorated plates.  You can also choose plates in a metal that contrast with the rest of the décor or the color of the doors they are applied to.  Polished brass pieces look brilliant on a white door, and copper pieces on a dark colored wood add just enough color difference to be noticeable.

Written by antiqueswriter

August 1, 2011 at 8:45 am

Victorian Mail Slots

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     Mail slots were once the preferred method of receiving your mail on a daily basis instead of the more modern mailbox that is mounted on a post by the side of the road.  This is especially true in rural areas where the most efficient way to get from building to building is by motorized vehicle.  There are still some areas throughout the country that have mail carriers who deliver on foot, and for locations like these mail slots may still be used.

One of the characteristics of a victorian style mail slot is the intricate design around the edges.

     Many homes, especially restorations, are installing mail slots on their doors to add a sense of whimsy or nostalgia to the home rather than for their functionality.  We have recognized the popularity of these items, and strive to carry a large selection of different kinds of mail slots, so there is at least one choice for every home style.  Mail slots tend to be overlooked on homes in which they are commonly used, but that doesn’t mean they need to be any less decorative.

     The Victorian style tends to be the most decorative in all of its components, from construction of homes and exterior decorations to the little details that can be found on any piece of hardware.  Mail slots are no exception.  While there is an overall design that can be seen, it’s the intricate details that are all along the exterior border that make the biggest difference.  Much time is taken to make sure that the border enhances the piece and draws the eye toward the overall design of the piece, rather than noticing one particular element at a time.

A victorian mail slot with a brushed nickel finish.

   Victorian mail slots are available in a myriad of different finishes, including polished chrome, oil rubbed bronze, polished and antique brass as well as nickel plated.  The antique brass seems to be the most classic and popular option, and really lets the design of the piece to stand out.  We list all the dimensions on our website to ensure that you get the right size mail slot, and include all mounting hardware necessary to complete your project.

Written by antiqueswriter

July 27, 2011 at 9:14 am

Eastlake Cup Pull with Label Holder

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    The Eastlake architectural style can be found all over the world, although it originated in New England in the late 1800’s.  While it is commonly lumped in with the Victorian architectural style, this cannot be further from the truth.  While the Eastlake style came to popularity while the Victorian era was still ending, it has many more unique qualities to it.  The primary components of this style were clean lines and geometric shapes.  Mass production was gaining in popularity, and the recent advances made it possible to duplicate these products on a much larger scale.

Click the image to learn more about various styles and movements in architecture and interior design.

     The Eastlake style is extremely popular in metal accents, especially with drawers, cabinets, and door hinges.  Many of the artists that made this style famous were prone to add decoration and direction to even the most mundane and overlooked pieces, and turned them all into works of art.  Where others failed to add any sort of adornment, Eastlake artisans flourished and took advantage of the blank canvas and made it their own.

 

     This particular example (pictured to the right) is a cup pull with label holder, and was found in offices everywhere.  It took an otherwise bland piece of furniture like a filing cabinet, and turned it into a piece that commanded attention by anyone in the room.  It’s functionality made it even more sought after, and they still are today.  It is an extremely durable piece because of its solid brass construction, which also makes it quite heavy.

 

     This piece is small, and measures less than 5″ high and just over 2″ tall.  All you need is a scrap piece of paper and you’ll have an instant label!  This piece is available in the popular finishes for it’s time: Polished Brass, Antique Brass, and Oil Rubbed Bronze.  These three can be found on most any piece of antique hardware, as well as many modern pieces.  We also include a pair of mounting screws in the same finish.

Written by antiqueswriter

June 29, 2011 at 8:57 am

Turtle Drawer Pull Back

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You can tell that Spring is finally trying to arrive. Yes, there’s still plenty of snow on the ground, and more snowstorms are being called for, but the sun is shining a little brighter, and the days are seeming just the slightest bit longer. It will still take quite some time for the snow to fully melt, but the days of shoveling out of the front door and digging to find the car will soon be things of the past, for a few months anyway.

So, what does this all mean? Simple; we can finally do some searching on our own, instead of relying on auctions and secondhand stores to provide it for us! We’ve been doing a lot of scouting from home, and made a few phone calls to some prospective places to search. There have been a few people who have sought us out, too, and have sent us samples of what they have to offer us.

Turtle Drawer Pull

This first piece is one of those such samples. The person that sent it to us didn’t tell us any of the history behind it, but guaranteed us that we would be very interested in it, as well as others they have to offer. This drawer pull backing is missing the swinging handle part, but that is very easy to replace, and fairly common, seeing how it is the part of the hardware that is actually used.

I first thought this looked like the shell of a turtle, but while a couple of my co-workers agreed with me, the more common thought was that of a pineapple. Perhaps they are all dreaming to escape from our Winter wonderland into a more tropical climate, or were just hungry. Maybe it’s a pineapple-eating turtle? This is going to be an absolute beauty once it’s cleaned up, and I can’t wait to find out more about it!

Written by antiqueswriter

April 5, 2011 at 8:40 am

Who’s That Lady?

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This is a gorgeous drawer handle is one of the most antique pieces we’ve ever featured. It is very worn, suggesting that it was either used for a long time, or that it was not well cared for. Fortunately, we have a little history on this piece, though not much.

We know that it was recovered from a building that caught fire and unfortunately the home was completely destroyed. The only good thing is that no one was injured in the fire. The home was full of antiques, and many of them were destroyed. Bystanders say that the wood caught fire more quickly than anyone had imagined.

The home was not in the historic part of town, but the owners were very avid antique collectors and had some absolutely exquisite pieces in their collection. While the wood itself did not make it, some of the hardware did, including this drawer pull. This piece was absolutely ridiculously filthy when we found it, and after a really good soak and scrubbing with our handy dandy toothbrush, we were able to uncover more details.Portrait Drawer Handle

This piece had a hand carved original that then had a negative made of it to create a mold, resulting in what you see today. The details on it are worn down, primarily from age, though the heat from the fire didn’t help. The floral work on the sides would have been considered exquisite in its day. We don’t have any real idea who the portrait is of, but have a few ideas.

It was not uncommon during that time to use a loved one as a model for various pieces, primarily because they didn’t have to be paid as models, and were always there as a reference when needed. This was most likely the creator’s wife, girlfriend, mother, or possibly daughter. Who would you use as your model?

Written by antiqueswriter

March 25, 2011 at 10:00 am

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