Period Style Hardware

Period Style & Antique or Vintage Hardware

Italianate Architecture in Europe and Australia

leave a comment »

John Nash made a huge name for himself all throughout England and Wales when it came to designing new Italianate structures.  Heavily influenced by Italian villas, he made this feature the primary focus of the majority of his buildings.  This helps to distinguish his style from many of the other architects that made the Italianate style their own.  Perhaps one of the reasons Nash became so popular is because he took so long to truly develop his own style.  Many of his earlier pieces were a mish mash of other architects interpretations of the Italianate style, never having anything particularly characteristic of himself.

Some other architects dabbled in this style as well, despite having already made a name for themselves in other styles.  One perfect example of this is Sir Charles Berry, who had made his name known for creating the House of Parliament building that we know today.  Some of the more popular points of Italianate architecture were series of columns and arches decorating the front of the buildings, exemplary of the Italian Renaissance style, and an abundance of balconies accented by wrought iron and stone.

The Italianate style was also very popular in Australia, specifically for homes of governors.  One very significant feature of the Australian architecture is its use of white and ivory for the exterior of the buildings.  This gives them a much cleaner look, while giving a nod to its ancient influences.

The interior design aspect of Italianate style features clean lines and everything built in.  That is to say instead of creating basic rooms with little to no decoration and having to adhere it separately, everything is incorporated during the building process.  Wood is not varnished or painted, but is displayed in its natural colors, there are no mitered corners.  Furniture features straight, clean lines, and is strong in style.

About these ads

Written by antiqueswriter

May 11, 2011 at 12:56 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: